Hope After Porn

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16 thoughts on “4 Things to Remember About Your Husband’s Porn Problem

  1. Very well written, there is “so” much truth to what you stated. I do like to read what the woman’s view is when they have had experience in this area first hand. You are correct, at least with me, whenever my wife would try to emulate anything I saw in porn, I was “not” turned on. Again, this is my view, but like you stated, it was “fantasy” and I could not cross over to reality…I could not perform at all. For me, I felt dirty even though what we did was nothing compared to what I had seen. I just could not relate my wife to what I saw, she meant more to me than lust. I do not lust after my wife, I love my wife and want to share my body with her. With porn it was selfish and all about me, those were just images on a screen that could not react or respond back…it was a one sided event, she (on the screen) was my slave for an “attempted” gratification that never gave me satisfaction.

    To date, I am 30 days porn clean. What is helping me? Definitely Covenant Eyes software, this has been a “huge” tool. I don’t feel as scared logging on because I know sites have been blocked. I gave in many times in the past because I felt helpless to the temptation, but knowing I can’t gives me a confidence that has reached beyond my own home. Also, I have stepped up my Bible studies.

    No, my wife could never be equal to the women on the screens because those women could never have the respect that I have learned to have towards my wife. “She” is elevated above fantasy because she is reality. I never want to go back to where I was, it was so empty, alone and frustrating….what a horrible pit, what a waste of time.

    Thank you for an awesome article, there’s much truth in where you speak.

    • Wow! I am rejoicing with you, not only for your 30 days porn free, but also the incredible way you have come to view your wife. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your story!!

  2. Wow! These reminders are right on time for me. It was enlightening to read that my role is to be the prayer warrior. It just clicked!!! The roller coaster of emotions that come with a spouse’s porn addiction are beautifully articulated in this article. Thank u for your bravery to speak out on such an unspoken issue. I know there are many women that these words are just perfect for! I am one of them! Thank u

  3. Jen,
    I would kindly disagree the offended spouse does need to put down boundaries which often are viewed by the offender as being “controlling”. As Marsha Means explains in her book “Your Sexually Addicted Spouse” having boundaries gives the wife the sense of safety & security she needs as part of her healing. If a husband is really working his recovery he will be more than willing to agree to these boundaries to show (with actions) not just words he is serious about his purity. Although filters are good many addicts can find ways around them easily. On most computers there is the option where the wife can have the “sign-on” & password so that if her husband wants to use the computer she is the only one that can sign him on, otherwise he can’t log on. If necessary take the computer out of the home. I counsel wives to decide with God’s wisdom along with much prayer & the help of a good therapist & her friends to put in place what SHE needs to feel safe & have security in her home again. If the husband balks a good resource I recommend is “Worthy of Her Trust”. Jason speaks bluntly to men. I read recently a man that still had Godly sorrow 30 years later for the pain he caused his wife due to his sexual sin. Although their marriage survived & is thriving just the fact that when he thinks of his past & has that “kind” of sorrow shows a man whose heart has truly been changed by God.

    Thank you Jen for sharing your painful story. May God bring the healing you need as you & your husband continue on your journey.

    • I think boundaries are really good, but Craig had to be in a place where he really wanted the boundaries. And I had to be in a place that I could still forgive him if he crossed the boundaries. I needed to trust God with Craig’s healing instead of using boundaries to heal him or myself to save him. My point here is that we can get so focused on boundaries that it is easy to place our security in those instead of God. Once Craig got to a place where he wanted to be safe, we could create boundaries together, ones that we still follow today. For example, if we are watching a movie that has unexpected sexual content and I feel it needs to be turned off, he will turn it off without argument. I am always free to check his phone or ask questions about what I find. He also has the right to ask me why I am fearing things and to keep me in check when I become controlling. Thank you for getting me to a place where I could clarify this!

    • Hi Michelle. I’m not sure what you’re looking for specifically, but let me link you to a blog post we put up a while back, that lists many resources for wives. Have a look through those and if you have specific questions, please feel free to leave those in the comment sections so we can respond.

      You might also want to look for a counselor in your area, or a group like Celebrate Recovery, Pure Desire, or S Anon. Know that whatever your husband or partner chooses, YOU can make healthy choices to find support as you move forward.

      Blessings, Kay

  4. This as a womandealing with her spouses porn problem really hit home with me. Can someone clarify what is the fine line between “control” and “encouragement”? I don’t want to be controlling or feel like the “policeman” but I want to encourage. Yes, I do pray, and try to be helpful. This was a good one for us women in how to deal with fine points of control/encouragement. I would also like to reiterate what someone said a few days ago in another blog response about CE providing the means to “blacklist” certain words (not just websites) since this is also a big problem. But thank you Covenant Eyes for all the good work you are doing. We are slowly making progress. and we need these additional blogs (beyond the 40 day challenge) to keep us going in new patterns of thinking

    • Hey Amanda. This is such a good question! I do think you absolutely need to know what’s going on with your husband in his process, and I agree that being the policeman is a disaster for everyone involved. I think the key is for him to concentrate on his stuff, and for you to concentrate on yours. Each of you take responsbility for yourselves.

      He concentrates on his part by filtering his internet, having accountability, going to a group, seeing a CSAT therapist, etc. Whatever he finds is helpful to him in his process, he needs to take responbility for those things and do them consistently. You should be able to ask him how it’s going and listen. You should be working toward the ability to have calm, rational conversations about how it’s going for him.

      You can concentrate on your part by seeing a counselor, going to a group–whatever it takes to help you process your emotions and work on healthy boundaries. Your main job should be YOUR OWN healing, rather than checking up on him.

      I find that the more we work on ourselves, the more we’re able to be supportive to others without needing to control them. When we find ourselves drifting over into control, we can course-correct by taking a time out to work on the emotions we’re experiencing and decide what healthy ways we’d rather deal with those emotions instead of trying to control others.

      Blessings, Kay

    • Kay has so many wonderful suggestions! I would add that when you feel like saying something about his addiction and don’t know if it will come across and encouraging or policing, it would be a good time to get quiet with God. So many times, He helped me figure out if what I was doing/saying was motivated by fear or love. And even if it is fear, that doesn’t mean you can’t say anything. So many times, I said to Craig something like, “I don’t necessarily think you’re looking at porn, but my insecurities are way high right now. Can you help me process through this?” Sometimes all I needed was affection from him, but in my mind I translated his distance automatically as his porn use, even though there could have been a myriad of other things.

  5. No matter how I try to help, my husband always tells me in being his mom. He says he want to stop hurting me and get over this but he won’t speak to anyone about his addiction. And he had promised me he would tell me when he had failed so I could pray for him and give forgiveness but it’s been a couple of months since he’s told me anything so I naively thought that things were getting better but I kept having a nagging feeling in the back of my head and in my heart that he was doing something he wasn’t supposed to the other day I looked through his phone and found things that broke my heart all over again and he told me that it was too painful for him to tell me but it hurt me way more finding it than it did when he was honest with me I don’t understand what else I can do I’ve prayed and prayed but it still hurts too bad

    • Hey there. I think what needs to happen here is you need to take care of YOU. Whatever your husband chooses, YOU find the support you need in this situation. We can’t control his choices, but we can do something about our own choices!

      Find a counselor who can help you process your emotions and build healthy boundaries.

      Join the online community at Bloom, where women are supported in recovery from marriage betrayal through private forums, classes, and other resources.

      Find a support group in your community.

      Whatever he chooses, YOU choose to be healthy.

      Peace to you, Kay

  6. Our story did not have a happy ending. After fighting porn for years – even pre-Internet – my husband decided he didn’t want to fight it any more. And he didn’t want me any more either. At some point he crossed into having lots of sex with lots of other women and just gave into the addiction. Now, at sixty, after almost forty years together, and in the church, I am struggling to make a new life for myself in a new country.
    Why are so many Christians loath to address this issue? It’s an epidemic! And shocking to find at least three Free view TV channels here in the UK that are beaming open, shameless porn into every household every night. No internet required. No one says anything. No church objects.

    • I am so, so sorry for all the years of pain you’ve been through.

      The church is run mostly men who use porn, and the church is mostly run by men–some 60% of whom are currently using porn, according to the Barna group. I’ve been involved with big Christian ministries (thousands of members) who know that their membership has a porn epidemic. But the problem is just too big, so they’ve basically stopped trying to deal with it.

      I’m sorry that you’re having to start over, but I suspect that someday you’ll see the “happy ending” in a different light, as you’re free from being linked to addiction. May you find healing and hope. May your future be full of light and life, freedom and peace.

      Peace to you,
      Kay

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