Porn in the Church: 5 Reasons We Shouldn’t Talk About It (Sarcasm Alert!)

5 reasons you should not talk about porn in church

Because no one in your church is looking at porn.

Sure, 79% of men ages 18 to 30 are looking at porn once a month and 63% are looking at it several times a week. It makes total sense that all the 18- to 30-year-old men in your church are a part of that 21% of men who aren’t looking at porn. I mean 21% is a big number right? And, yeah, 76% of women in that age bracket are looking at porn monthly, but the stats give you a whopping 24% who aren’t, and those have got to be the ones in your church. Same for the 67% of men ages 31 to 49, 49% of men ages 50 to 68, 38% of women ages 31 to 49, and 25% of women ages 50 to 68 who are looking at porn monthly.[1]

The reason these stats are relevant is because of how important it is that churches deal with the real issues enslaving people to sin and keeping them from the abundant life Jesus promises. But since no one in your church is looking at porn, then by all means, continue to avoid it at all costs, because (see Point #2) the Bible certainly does!

Because the Bible has nothing to say about porn.

We preach the Bible, right? Well yes…but with this, it’s important to only preach the PG sections of the Bible. I mean, you might have kids in the sanctuary, and you don’t want them hearing about naughty things. So it’s best to keep everything at the level of a Pixar comedy in order to bring about real transformation in people. Because we all know life is just like a Pixar comedy. It’s not as if our kids and their friends own tablets and smartphones with unlimited access to graphic sex and nudity right? No way. And even if they did, our kids would never look at that stuff. They only use their phones to watch Bibleman and Veggie Tales.

When preaching the Bible, it’s important to skip Proverbs 5-7, skip 1 Corinthians 6:12-20, skip Matthew 5:27-30, and skip David’s debacle with Bathsheba in 2 Samuel 11. If you’re really brave, you can teach people to save sex until marriage, but don’t mention porn. And you’ll want to spell out “S-E-X” instead of saying the word because little ears will be listening. Most importantly, remember that everything is perfect in the lives behind those happy, shining faces you see every Sunday morning. Just ask someone how they are doing and I guarantee they will say “good” or “great” or maybe even “I’m blessed!” Enough said, no issues there.

Because talking about porn in church will make people uncomfortable.

You’re not going to grow a church by making people uncomfortable. And you never find Jesus making people uncomfortable. If anyone knew how to draw a crowd and keep them happy, it was Jesus. People don’t want to hear about sin or awkward things like porn, they just want to feel good, so give them what they want. Scratch their itch. Not that the Bible says anything about “itching ears,” like in 2 Timothy 4:3. It’s not as if there is a huge group of people who have left the Church because its sermons are increasingly irrelevant to what people are actually going through. It’s not as if we are all sinners in the same boat, fallen short of a holy God, or that Jesus’s grace covers all.

Because porn is a topic reserved for extreme sex addict groups.

Only freaks with major issues talk about porn. If you start talking about it from your pulpit, people will start to think you might be one of those freaks! I mean, what’s so appealing about porn anyway? It contains the endorphin rush and pleasure of sex without any of the sacrifice or commitment. It’s not like any normal person is going to want that or be drawn to that.

Because the Church doesn’t actually contain the solution to porn!

This one hits home. The biggest reason not to talk about porn in church is because we’ve got nothing on porn. Porn offers people fake intimacy, fake love, and a fake sense of value. What on earth could the Church possibly have that could be better than that? It’s a really good thing we don’t talk about porn because Jesus’s love poured out on the cross, His adopting us as sons and daughters, His marrying us as His Bride, and His calling us valuable, whole, righteous, complete, loved, and holy because of what He did on our behalf really doesn’t hold a candle to porn. So as long as we believe that, it’s best to not bring up “the P-Word” or we might end up revealing Jesus for how weak we truly believe He is.

For a complete (and less sarcastic!) conversation about porn in the Church, including Pastor Noah’s personal testimony of overcoming porn, view this Covenant Eyes Facebook Live conversation between Pastor Noah Filipiak and Covenant Eyes CEO Ron DeHaas:

And if you think that we should, in fact, be talking about porn in church and want to help your own congregation start taking action, check out Communities by Covenant Eyes.

Communities helps churches, small groups, non-profits, and others facilitate a culture of accountability and openness. They allow large groups to sign up quickly and easily for Covenant Eyes Internet Accountability, and help people connect to each other.

Learn More About Communities

 

 

[1] 2014 Pornography Survey and Statistics. Proven Men Ministries. http://www.provenmen.org/2014pornsurvey/ (accessed Dec. 29, 2014 by Covenant Eyes’ 2015 Pornography Statistics Packet, page 8).